5G is here, but it won’t really flourish on next-generation phones and 5G connected cars until the network is built out…

“This is the biggest infrastructure project after the interstate highway system,” says Sean Shahini, CEO of Inorsa, an engineering startup that focuses on lean, fast 5G network site builds. Those sites aren’t just retrofits of existing 4G towers: Some will proceed easily, but “the range of (most of) our antennas is way less than with 4G, so instead of building 100 antennas, for example, to cover Manhattan, we have to build 5,000 to 20,000 antennas,” says Shahini.

Continue Reading @ c|net

Parents just as addicted to their smartphones as their kids | New York Post

More than one-third of teenagers and over one-quarter of parents wake up and check their mobile device for something other than the time at least once a night, according to a new report by Common Sense Media, a San Francisco-based organization that examines the impact of technology and media on families. The organization surveyed 1,000 parents and their children.

Family of four on couch all looking at smartphones.

Source: Parents just as addicted to their smartphones as their kids

What does the “G” represent in 3G and 4G?

If you are a mobile web user of the cellular phone systems, you may have heard the terms, 3G and 4G. I recently had someone ask me, “What does the “G” stand for?”.  Ironically, the answer to that question fell right into my lap while working on my blog.

Below is a clip from a PC Magazine Article, “What is 4G, And Do I Need It?” , that answers the “G” questions for us.

A “G” is a generation of wireless technology. Each generation offers significantly faster Internet access than the previous generation, but it’s incompatible with the previous generation—you have to upgrade your phone to use it, and carriers usually have to install new hardware.

The first G was the old analog cellular systems. 2G systems are digital, but slow. Many phones still use 2G. Internet speeds on 2G phones range from 9.6 Kbits/s to about 200 Kbps. 3G systems run from about 384 Kbps to—well, we’ll get to that.

4G systems such as LTE and WiMAX claim to have real-life speeds of 5 Mbits/s or greater, much like a home cable connection. The most recent versions of these technologies promise speeds in the hundreds of Mbits/s, faster than any home Internet connection available right now. 4G systems are also “all-IP.” Down the road, they’ll be able to replace the old circuit-switched voice phone calling with voice-over-IP systems. [SOURCE: PC MAGAZINE]

 

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