Bublup – A visually appealing bookmarking app where you can save, collect, and share just about anything…

Bublup is the new modern visually appealing way to collect and save, not only links, but PDF’s, photos, videos, GIF’s, notes, emails and other types of files. These items can be saved in the same folders together, making it ideal for research and for establishing collections. A cool component of Bublup is when you save something, other relevant information relating to the topic you saved, will bubble up. There is also a method to import your bookmarks into Bublup from Chrome, Safari and Firefox. With a FREE account you get 3 GB of storage and if that is not enough, go for one of the paid options. So far, here at Tech News for You, we are liking what we see with Bublup… Almost forgot, you can create Roll web pages instantly from Bublup folders. Customize them easily into beautiful stories and collections of your content including links, photos, videos, GIFs, notes, PDFs, and other files. Bublup is available on the web, in your browser, and as an iOS and Android app.

Source: Bublup

Preview web pages from results of your favorite search engine…

The browser extension ‘URL Render‘ permits you to navigate websites without leaving the search results pages. When you over a link on the search result page it open the website on the free space and allow you to preview – navigate on it. The browser extension is meant to increase your efficiency and speed, allowing you to find the information you need more rapidly.

Source: URL Render 

Make Sure You Check Out “Collections” In The NEW Microsoft Edge

I am sold on Microsoft Edge. If you haven’t downloaded it yet, it will be heading your way soon; but, if you can’t wait, CLICK HERE. If you are an existing user of Microsoft Edge, make sure you check out the “Collections” feature. To access the feature, click on the “Collections Icon” on the toolbar (see below) next to the address bar. This icon will open what is called the “Collections” pane where you can create, edit and view collections of web links. For example, I am now using “Collections” when shopping, blogging, or researching a specific topic and will group my findings in individual collections.

Another, more efficient way to use “Collections” is to right mouse click on any page; and, from the menu you can start a new collection or add to an existing collection.

I am finding “Collections” to be super handy and wanted to make sure you are using it. You will not be disappointed…


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Vivaldi >> The Portable Freeware Collection

Here is a great way to try the Vivaldi (Chromium) web browser. I am closely monitoring the development of this browser.

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Vivaldi is a customizable, tabbed web browser based on the same engine as Google Chrome. Its appearance and capabilities can be extended with themes and extensions. It features a bookmark manager, speed dial, notes, custom search engines, sessions, tab stacks, web panels, mouse gestures, keyboard shortcuts, user interface scaling, adaptive interface color and much more.

Cross-platform with clients available for Mac and Linux.

Source: Vivaldi – The Portable Freeware Collection

Which One Is Your Favorite “Chromium Platform Browser”?

To you folks at home, I am sure you are very familiar with Google Chrome. Google Chrome is Google’s signature web browser; but, did you know that Google Chrome is a spin off of what is called Chromium. Chromium (as defined by Wikipedia) is “a Google-developed, free and open-source project whose source code can be compiled into a web browser”. There is actually a Chromium web browser.

As result of the Chromium platform being open source, other entities can freely use the source code to develop their own signature web browser platforms. For example, here at “What’s On My PC” I have installed on my computer (for testing purposes) Google Chrome, the new Microsoft Edge, Vivaldi and Brave. Each one of the these browsers are built off the source code of Chromium and if you install and test drive these browsers you will notice the similarities to that of Google Chrome; however, each of these browsers have unique features.

Which one is better? Actually, they are all very good and it is exciting to see these browsers in competition with each other. It really comes down to a matter of opinion and maybe loyalty. Maybe you love Google products, Microsoft products or you like the idea of Open Source products. Maybe you love additional features; want more privacy and security; you want faster;  or, like myself, you love trying new software applications.

Which one is my favorite??? At this point (and that can change at anytime), my favorite is the open source browser called BRAVE. What is catching my attention with BRAVE is the (to the naked eye) smoothness, clarity and speed; the more aggressive security and privacy protections; and, the seamless compatibility with the Google Chrome Store (to install my browser extensions).

What “Chromium Platform Browser” is your favorite? Feel free to comment….


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What’s On My PC

What You Need To Do In Order to Save and Open Google Docs, Sheets & Slides Offline

The past several days here at “What’s On My PC” I have been focused on various office suites that are available for FREE for folks at home. Each of those suites requires software to be installed. Another, online option, that requires no installation, that I find many people at home overlook is Google Docs (which includes Google Docs, Sheets and Slides). You can do a lot with this office suite and you can even configure this office suite so that you can save and open your files, even when you are offline (not connected to the internet). The only requirement to turn “on” offline use is that you use the Google Chrome browser and install a browser extension (see instructions below).

Continue reading “What You Need To Do In Order to Save and Open Google Docs, Sheets & Slides Offline”

Digital Clock Overlay For Google Chrome

Came across a small digital clock browser extension for Google Chrome that may be of interest to you. Once you download and install the extension, you will see a small digital clock appear in the top right corner of loaded webpages. You can customize the color, transparency, font, time format, and the location where you want the clock to appear. For example, I changed the color to black digits on a white background and moved the clock further down from its’ default location. This is a very handy clock to see what time it is. You can read about and get “Overlay Clock” from the Google Chrome Store at the source link reflected below.

Screenshot of the “Settings Menu”

Screenshot of where the “Overlay Clock” Appears

Source:  Google Chrome Store – Overlay Clock

Quick Tip: Keyboard Shortcut To Go “Page Backward” or “Page Forward” In Your Web Browser

These two keyboard shortcuts work in Google Chrome and Microsoft Edge for sure; and, may work in the other web browsers as well.

  1. When wanting to go a page backward in your web browser you typically mouse click on the “back button”. You can also perform the same function on the keyboard by hitting the “ALT + “left arrow” keys.
  2. When wanting to go a page forward in your web browser you typically mouse click on the “forward button”.  You can also perform the same function on the keyboard by hitting the “ALT + “right arrow” keys.

Quick Tip: Did you know you can perform a search from your browser’s address bar?

I have found that many folks at home do not know that you can perform an internet search by typing what you are looking for in the browser’s address bar. For example, I use Google Chrome. I can perform a Google Search by going to the address bar (at the top) and typing in what I am looking for. This saves me from having to go to Google.com to perform a search. This also works in the browsers on your smartphones and tablets, as well.

Depending on your browser, the default search engine or provider can be changed in your browser’s settings.  Some people like Google, other’s like Bing (and so forth).

 

 

Quick Tip: Learn About Browser Tabs

When you open your web browser (i.e. Google Chrome, Microsoft Edge, Firefox, Opera, etc…) you initially open up to a page that is your designated home page. At the top of the browser window, you will see what is called a “Tab”. The “Tab” will look like a tab that you may have seen on a file folder that you place into a file cabinet. The “Tab” to a file folder in the file cabinet lets you know the contents of the file folder. The same principle applies with “Tabs” in a web browser. You can open another web page by adding another tab, in conjunction with others; therefore, you could have multiple “Tabs” open. You can switch between these tabs anytime, which is helpful and productive. What I have found with basic computer users they are unaware of browser tabs and often have a hard time grasping the concept. I usually can tell this when I go to help them and they have multiple tabs open. The “Tabs” are easy to close, by clicking on the “X”,  and should be closed when not in use,  in order to conserve computer memory.

Below is a screenshot of the browser tabs that I had open while I was composing this article… If you noticed at the last tab labeled “Facebook” there is a “+” sign. If you click on that plus sign in your browser at home, you can add another tab. Also, notice the “X” at each browser tab, that will close the selected tab, if you click on it. Also, some links you click on when web browsing will open additional tabs. Again, a good idea to close down tabs that you are not using.

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